Motorcycle Battery Chargers and Its Models

The progression of science and technology has made us completely independent in terms of using electronic gadgets. With the availability of supplementary batteries with these electronic gadgets it becomes quite easy for use them anytime at any place whenever we want. The batteries completely zero down the need of electricity for the product functioning. Nowadays gadget comes with batteries that can be charged at regular intervals to provide continuous working in the absence of the main power supply. However, for charging the batteries you need the good type of charger.

Battery charger is referred to as a device which is used to input electrical energy into another electrical cell, or rechargeable battery through an electric current.These chargers are one of the best ways to recharge the gadget battery in order to reuse them as per our requirement. Though, this charger is light in weight as compared to the batteries.

We may find the numerous suppliers for charging the batteries of different gadgets that are Trickle charger, Fast charger, Inductive charger, solar charger, pulse charger, intelligent charger, etc.

Let us discuss few of them in some detail:

The fast charger is the one that uses the controlled circuitry in the battery to charge it quickly without causing any damage to the cells of the battery. There are also few fast chargers which have the capacity to charge the NiMH batteries mainly found in digital cameras, cordless phones, laptops, etc.

Trickle charger is the most widely used charger these days which charges a battery at slow and self discharging rate. A battery keeps on charging by way of trickle charger slowly and slowly but never over-charges it. Few examples of this are motorcycle battery charger, car charger, lawn mower charger etc.

Simultaneously, we can have numerous models of motorcycle battery charger is available in the market such as BMW Motorcycle Battery Charger, Schumacher MC-1 Manual Trickle Charger, Battery Tender 021-0144 Battery Tender Plus 6V Charger, Battery Tender 021-0123 etc, which may provide you the perfect battery charging to overcome the battery breakdown blues.

Then are the solar chargers which use the solar energy to recharge the batteries and are found to be portable, convenient and environment friendly in nature. These specific chargers are used for charging numerous products like gate openers, deer feeders, electronic portables and electric fences, etc.

Another one is the Inductive charger that makes use of electromagnetic induction to charge batteries. This is done mainly by charging station which sends electromagnetic energy by pairing inductive energy to an electrical device for recharging battery. Apart from these there are other chargers also which is used for charging timer based and USB based applications.

 

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Motorcycle Suspension – Basic Set Up

Modern sporting motorcycles can come with a near dizzying array of suspension adjustability. Pre-load, compression damping, rebound, high-speed damping, low-speed damping, etc. Where to start?

Before you start looking over your bike to see what we’re talking about, please note this article is primarily intended for the sportbike rider. Most cruisers have little or no suspension adjustability. You either live with what the factory gave you, you have your suspension components upgraded with after market units, or have the internal bits replaced by a professional.

The easiest and most important adjustment you can make is to set the static sag. Sag is just what it sounds like – how much the bike sags when you’re on it.

Ideally your sag should be from 25 to 30 mm, or 1 to 1 ½ inches, on most bikes. To find out where your sag is, you’ll need a helper. Dress up in all your usual riding apparel, including helmet, leathers, boots, etc. You want to set your sag using the same weight as when you ride. While standing next to the bike, push down on the tail once or twice to make sure the suspension is at its normal resting position.

Using a dowel rod, yard stick, or similar device, measure the distance from the ground to a particular point on the motorcycle. Turn signals or a point on the seat or frame will work fine. Just make sure the point you measure from is not covered up when you’re on the bike. OK, got the measurement? Either write down the measurement (in inches or millimeters) or simply mark the spot on your rod/stick.

Now get on the motorcycle, in full gear. This is where your helper is needed. For the most accurate measurement, try to hold the bike fully vertical with both your feet on the pegs. In this position, take another measurement. See the difference? That is your sag. If it’s smaller than 1 inch or greater than 1 ½ inches, you’ll need to adjust the pre-load on your forks and/or shock to get the desired results. Increase pre-load (usually a clockwise turn of the adjusting screw or collar) a little at a time to reduce your sag. Decreasing pre-load will increase the amount your bike sags.

Adjusting rebound and compression damping is considerably more complicated, and requires riding your bike and trying different settings over time. More compression damping in front reduces the amount your bike will dive under braking. More in the back will reduce how much the rear end squats under power. Too much compression damping can cause the bike to ride rough, transmitting every bump in the road to you without absorbing much. If you’re only riding on a smooth racetrack, more compression damping might be a good thing. If you ride on gnarly back roads, you’ll probably want to soften up your settings.

Rebound damping affects how much your wheels “bounce” off the brakes and wallow under power. Too much rebound damping and your suspension will not react fast enough to properly follow bumps in the road. Your forks or shock can get “packed down” by repeated bumps, which reduces your suspension travel and can lead to a very poor ride, or worse. Too little rebound damping in the front or rear and your bike will be wallowing around like a ’68 Cadillac, making it very unpleasant and hard to control.

Your mission is to find the right balance for you and your riding style. Generally it’s best to start out with the settings your bike came with from the factory. There’s a reason why they’re set where they are. From there, spend a little time on the bike. Is it too stiff? Does it wallow? Pay attention to how the different ends of the bike feel. Adjust accordingly, but not too much. We suggest adjusting in increments of one click at a time, until you find the sweet spot you’re looking for.

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