Motorcycle Suspension – Basic Set Up

Modern sporting motorcycles can come with a near dizzying array of suspension adjustability. Pre-load, compression damping, rebound, high-speed damping, low-speed damping, etc. Where to start?

Before you start looking over your bike to see what we’re talking about, please note this article is primarily intended for the sportbike rider. Most cruisers have little or no suspension adjustability. You either live with what the factory gave you, you have your suspension components upgraded with after market units, or have the internal bits replaced by a professional.

The easiest and most important adjustment you can make is to set the static sag. Sag is just what it sounds like – how much the bike sags when you’re on it.

Ideally your sag should be from 25 to 30 mm, or 1 to 1 ½ inches, on most bikes. To find out where your sag is, you’ll need a helper. Dress up in all your usual riding apparel, including helmet, leathers, boots, etc. You want to set your sag using the same weight as when you ride. While standing next to the bike, push down on the tail once or twice to make sure the suspension is at its normal resting position.

Using a dowel rod, yard stick, or similar device, measure the distance from the ground to a particular point on the motorcycle. Turn signals or a point on the seat or frame will work fine. Just make sure the point you measure from is not covered up when you’re on the bike. OK, got the measurement? Either write down the measurement (in inches or millimeters) or simply mark the spot on your rod/stick.

Now get on the motorcycle, in full gear. This is where your helper is needed. For the most accurate measurement, try to hold the bike fully vertical with both your feet on the pegs. In this position, take another measurement. See the difference? That is your sag. If it’s smaller than 1 inch or greater than 1 ½ inches, you’ll need to adjust the pre-load on your forks and/or shock to get the desired results. Increase pre-load (usually a clockwise turn of the adjusting screw or collar) a little at a time to reduce your sag. Decreasing pre-load will increase the amount your bike sags.

Adjusting rebound and compression damping is considerably more complicated, and requires riding your bike and trying different settings over time. More compression damping in front reduces the amount your bike will dive under braking. More in the back will reduce how much the rear end squats under power. Too much compression damping can cause the bike to ride rough, transmitting every bump in the road to you without absorbing much. If you’re only riding on a smooth racetrack, more compression damping might be a good thing. If you ride on gnarly back roads, you’ll probably want to soften up your settings.

Rebound damping affects how much your wheels “bounce” off the brakes and wallow under power. Too much rebound damping and your suspension will not react fast enough to properly follow bumps in the road. Your forks or shock can get “packed down” by repeated bumps, which reduces your suspension travel and can lead to a very poor ride, or worse. Too little rebound damping in the front or rear and your bike will be wallowing around like a ’68 Cadillac, making it very unpleasant and hard to control.

Your mission is to find the right balance for you and your riding style. Generally it’s best to start out with the settings your bike came with from the factory. There’s a reason why they’re set where they are. From there, spend a little time on the bike. Is it too stiff? Does it wallow? Pay attention to how the different ends of the bike feel. Adjust accordingly, but not too much. We suggest adjusting in increments of one click at a time, until you find the sweet spot you’re looking for.

add comment

How to Ride a Motorcycle Properly

Motorcycling is a great deal of fun. But it’s very important to learn how to ride defensively and respect the motorcycle and it’s power. If you start out with this attitude at the outset, you will ensure that you’re entering this high risk activity with thoughtfulness and self-preservation, and it will make the riding experience so much more enjoyable.

Perhaps you know what type of motorcycle you want, or you already own a bike, or maybe you just want some refresher information — no matter who you are or where you are in the process of riding, you can use this online guide and information as a source of information on anything from how to start riding to wearing the proper gear or to whatever.

And please know that the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) offers rider safety and education courses. The courses are covered in more depth further in this article and found as its own section on our site (you can go to our website for more info on the MSF rider courses.

Proper Riding Gear

Whether you are just learning to ride or you’re already an experienced biker, remember to always wear your safety gear. Going down on a motorcycle hurts, there’s no denying it. Have you ever fallen off a bicycle? Remember how badly your skin and hands hurt because they were scraped along the street or sidewalk? Remember how easily your knees and elbows bruised? Now magnify that based on the speed your traveling on the motorcycle. Even if you’re driving around the block in your development or driving in a parking lot, you will easily scrape yourself up worse than any bicycle fall. I’m not stating this to scare you away from riding a motorcycle, I just want to make sure you protect yourself by wearing as much safety gear as possible, including gloves, leather jacket or armored clothing, boots, goggles or sunglasses, and a helmet (which is required by law in most states) . Go to my website to view the proper gear and shopping pages. Once you have your proper riding gear, you’re ready to get on the bike.

Getting On

Before you just jump in the saddle, you should do a T-CLOCS check of the bike. Let me explain —- EVERY TIME before you ride, you should make sure it’s fit to be on the road. The Motorcycle Safety Foundation has a checklist they call T-CLOCS:

T — Tires, wheels (air pressure)

C — Controls (clutch lever, throttle, brakes/pedals, cables, hoses)

L — Light (battery, headlights, turn signals, mirrors)

O — Oil (and other fluid levels)

C — Chassis (the frame, suspension, chain/belt, etc.)

S — Stands (kickstand and/or the center stand )

If the motorcycle checks out just fine, you’re ready to get in the saddle. Always mount the motorcycle by throwing your right leg over the seat. When getting off, always bring your right leg back over the seat. This is done for two very important reasons: 1) The kickstand is on the left side of the bike and that’s where the motorcycle weight is hanging. 2) When getting off, it is very easy to burn your leg on the exhaust pipes on the right side of the bike, and you don’t want to get your leg caught on the seat and pull the bike down on you.

So, starting at the left of the motorcycle, grab a hold of the handlebars, put the weight of your body on your left leg, and lift and throw your right leg over the seat and onto the other side of the bike. Take a seat on the motorcycle. Take your time and get accustomed to the bike. Make sure your mirrors are adjusted properly to where you’re sitting, get used to where the controls are (horn, turn signals, lights, etc.). While the kickstand is still down and holding the bike upright, put your feet on the pegs and get a feel for your leg positioning.

add comment
-